Disclaimer

If you do not know me (I mean, really know me) then there is something you need to understand before you read this blog: I value the truth above everything else... except a good laugh. A good laugh will almost always beat the truth as far as I’m concerned. Everything you read on this blog will be true, somewhat true, or something I made up in an effort to get a laugh. Sometimes I will go on a rant that I don’t really mean (or only kind of mean). Sometimes I will mean what I write only to completely change my mind a year, month, or day later. Such is life. By reading this blog you agree not to get offended by anything I write (or, at the very least, you agree not to tell me or anyone else that you are offended). It is worth noting that my employer does not endorse my blog (or even read it, to tell you the truth). The Wife also does not endorse my blog (though she will read it from time to time). I am not paid to write this... it’s just my way of giving back to the community. I have, and will, touch on a wide range of subjects and will give my opinion on these subjects. Again, most of what I say is for laughs but every now and then I will say what I really think and feel (see my views on Westboro Baptist Cult). How will you know when I’m serious and when I’m trying to get a laugh? You’ll know. And if you don’t know, well... maybe this isn’t the best thing for you to be reading. So, sit back, read and enjoy. Leave comments if you want and don’t be afraid to publicly follow me.



Sunday, March 31, 2013

Happy Easter! Part XV – The Mount Rushmore of … Rangers/Astros

Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Second Lieutenant Robert Ronald Leisy (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on December 2, 1969, in Phuoc Long province, Republic of Vietnam. His citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. 2d Lt. Leisy, Infantry, Company B, distinguished himself while serving as platoon leader during a reconnaissance mission. One of his patrols became heavily engaged by fire from a numerically superior enemy force located in a well-entrenched bunker complex. As 2d Lt. Leisy deployed the remainder of his platoon to rescue the beleaguered patrol, the platoon also came under intense enemy fire from the front and both flanks. In complete disregard for his safety, 2d Lt. Leisy moved from position to position deploying his men to effectively engage the enemy. Accompanied by his radio operator he moved to the front and spotted an enemy sniper in a tree in the act of firing a rocket-propelled grenade at them. Realizing there was neither time to escape the grenade nor shout a warning, 2d Lt. Leisy unhesitatingly, and with full knowledge of the consequences, shielded the radio operator with his body and absorbed the full impact of the explosion. This valorous act saved the life of the radio operator and protected other men of his platoon who were nearby from serious injury. Despite his mortal wounds, 2d Lt. Leisy calmly and confidently continued to direct the platoon's fire. When medical aid arrived, 2d Lt. Leisy valiantly refused attention until the other seriously wounded were treated. His display of extraordinary courage and exemplary devotion to duty provided the inspiration and leadership that enabled his platoon to successfully withdraw without further casualties. 2d Lt. Leisy's gallantry at the cost of his life are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on him, his unit, and the U.S. Army.

Seaman Emile Lejeune (US Navy) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on June 6, 1876, on board the USS Plymouth. His citation reads:

Serving on board the U.S.S. Plymouth, Lejeune displayed gallant conduct in rescuing a citizen from drowning at Port Royal, S.C., 6 June 1876.

Gunner’s Mate George W. Leland (US Navy) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on November 16, 1863, on board the USS Lehigh. His citation reads:

Serving on board the U.S.S. Lehigh, Charleston Harbor, 16 November 1863, during the hazardous task, of freeing the Lehigh, which had grounded, and was under heavy enemy fire from Fort Moultrie. Rowing the small boat which was used in the hazardous task of transferring hawsers from the Lehigh to the Nahant, Leland twice succeeded in making the trip, only to find that each had been in vain when the hawsers were cut by enemy fire and chaffing.


First, I’d like to wish all of you out there a very Happy Easter! As I’ve said before, while Christmas gets most of the pub Easter shouldn’t be overlooked. Jesus died for our sins (and, more importantly, defeated death) and that’s as good a reason as I can think of to celebrate.

Thanks to Wikipedia for the info…

The Mount Rushmore of the Texas Rangers

Nolan Ryan – Years with the Rangers: 1989 - 1993

Highlights with the Rangers: All-Star (1989)
129 Games Pitched
51 Wins
15 Complete Games
6 Shutouts
939 Strike Outs
Texas Rangers #34 retired
Texas Rangers Hall of Fame
Inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1999
I could have easily put Nolan Ryan on four lists… as it stands you might see his name later in this post. They don’t make pitchers like Nolan Ryan anymore. He is on the short-list of greatest pitchers ever.

Ruben Sierra – Years with the Rangers: 1986 – 1992, 2000 – 2001, 2003

Highlights with the Rangers: 3× All-Star selection (1989, 1991, 1992)
Silver Slugger Award winner (1989)
2001 AL Comeback Player of the Year
AL RBI champion (1989)
Texas Rangers Hall of Fame

John Wetteland – Years with the Rangers: 1997 - 2000

Highlights with the Rangers: 2× All-Star (1998, 1999)
Texas Rangers Hall of Fame

Charlie Hough – Years with the Rangers: 1980 - 1990

Highlights with the Rangers: All-Star selection (1986)
Texas Rangers Hall of Fame


Honorable Mention: Mark Teixeira, Josh Hamilton


The Mount Rushmore of the Houston Astros

Nolan Ryan – Years with the Astros: 1980 - 1988

Highlights with the Astros: 2× All-Star (1981, 1985)
282 Games Pitched
106 Wins
38 Complete Games
13 Shutouts
1,866 Strike Outs
Houston Astros #34 retired
Inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1999
For the record… the Angels have retired his #30. He’s the only person other than Jackie Robinson (who had his number retired by all MLB teams) to have his number by 3 different teams). Oh yeah… For his career Nolan Ryan had 5,714 strikeouts and 7 no-hitters.

Craig Biggio – Years with the Astros: 1988 - 2007

Highlights with the Astros: 7× All-Star (1991, 1992, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998)
4× Gold Glove Award winner (1994, 1995, 1996, 1997)
5× Silver Slugger Award winner (1989, 1994, 1995, 1997, 1998)
Houston Astros #7 retired
He’s not in the Baseball Hall of Fame yet, but he should (and, I hope, will) be soon. Biggio was an incredible player who was great as a catcher, second baseman AND outfielder. He was a star who was willing to play wherever the team needed him (something you don’t always see at that level). Perhaps my favorite stat is that Biggio holds the modern career record for most times hit by a pitch (285).

Mike Scott – Years with the Astros: 1983 - 1991

Highlights with the Astros: 3× All-Star (1986, 1987, 1989)
NL Cy Young Award (1986)
1986 National League Strikeout Champion
1986 National League ERA Champion
1989 National League Wins Champion
Threw a no-hitter (September 25, 1986)
NLCS MVP (1986)
Houston Astros #33 retired

Jeff Bagwell - Years with the Astros: 1991 - 2005

Highlights with the Astros: 4× All-Star (1994, 1996, 1997, 1999)
1991 NL Rookie of the Year
Gold Glove Award winner (1994)
3× Silver Slugger Award winner (1994, 1997, 1999)
1994 NL MVP
Houston Astros #5 retired

Honorable Mention: Ken Caminiti

As always, remember to check out Sonny’Side to see who my brother had on his lists.


The I’m just sayin… Proverb of the Week
Proverbs 10:24

What the wicked dread will overtake them;
    what the righteous desire will be granted.

Friday, March 29, 2013

Part XIV – The Mount Rushmore of … Phillies/Rockies

Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Seaman James H. Lee (US Navy) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on June 19, 1864, on board the USS Kearsarge. His citation reads:

Served as seaman on board the U.S.S. Kearsarge when she destroyed the Alabama off Cherbourg, France, 19 June 1864. Acting as sponger of the No. 1 gun during this bitter engagement, Lee exhibited marked coolness and good conduct and was highly recommended for his gallantry under fire by the divisional officer.

Private First Class Milton A. Lee (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on April 26, 1968, near Phu Bai, Thua Thien province, Republic of Vietnam. His citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. Pfc. Lee distinguished himself near the city of Phu Bai in the province of Thua Thien. Pfc. Lee was serving as the radio telephone operator with the 3d platoon, Company B. As lead element for the company, the 3d platoon received intense surprise hostile fire from a force of North Vietnamese Army regulars in well-concealed bunkers. With 50 percent casualties, the platoon maneuvered to a position of cover to treat their wounded and reorganize, while Pfc. Lee moved through the heavy enemy fire giving lifesaving first aid to his wounded comrades. During the subsequent assault on the enemy defensive positions, Pfc. Lee continuously kept close radio contact with the company commander, relaying precise and understandable orders to his platoon leader. While advancing with the front rank toward the objective, Pfc. Lee observed 4 North Vietnamese soldiers with automatic weapons and a rocket launcher Lying in wait for the lead element of the platoon. As the element moved forward, unaware of the concealed danger, Pfc. Lee immediately and with utter disregard for his own personal safety, passed his radio to another soldier and charged through the murderous fire. Without hesitation he continued his assault, overrunning the enemy position, killing all occupants and capturing 4 automatic weapons and a rocket launcher. Pfc. Lee continued his 1-man assault on the second position through a heavy barrage of enemy automatic weapons fire. Grievously wounded, he continued to press the attack, crawling forward into a firing position and delivering accurate covering fire to enable his platoon to maneuver and destroy the position. Not until the position was overrun did Pfc. Lee falter in his steady volume of fire and succumb to his wounds. Pfc. Lee's heroic actions saved the lives of the lead element and were instrumental in the destruction of the key position of the enemy defense. Pfc. Lee's gallantry at the risk of life above and beyond the call of duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on himself, the 502d Infantry, and the U.S. Army.

Second Lieutenant John Harold Leims (US Marine Corps) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on March 7, 1945, on Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands. His citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as commanding officer of Company B, 1st Battalion, 9th Marines, 3d Marine Division, in action against enemy Japanese forces on Iwo Jima in the Volcano Islands, 7 march 1945. Launching a surprise attack against the rock-imbedded fortification of a dominating Japanese hill position, 2d Lt. Leims spurred his company forward with indomitable determination and, skillfully directing his assault platoons against the cave-emplaced enemy troops and heavily fortified pillboxes, succeeded in capturing the objective in later afternoon. When it became apparent that his assault platoons were cut off in this newly won position, approximately 400 yards forward of adjacent units and lacked all communication with the command post, he personally advanced and laid telephone lines across the isolating expanse of open fire-swept terrain. Ordered to withdraw his command after he had joined his forward platoons, he immediately complied, adroitly effecting the withdrawal of his troops without incident. Upon arriving at the rear, he was informed that several casualties had been left at the abandoned ridge position beyond the frontlines. Although suffering acutely from the strain and exhausting of battle, he instantly went forward despite darkness and the slashing fury of hostile machinegun fire, located and carried to safety 1 seriously wounded marine and then, running the gauntlet of enemy fire for the third time that night, again made his tortuous way into the bullet-riddled deathtrap and rescued another of his wounded men. A dauntless leader, concerned at all time for the welfare of his men, 2d Lt. Leims soundly maintained the coordinated strength of his battle-wearied company under extremely difficult conditions and, by his bold tactics, sustained aggressiveness, and heroic disregard for all personal danger, contributed essentially to the success of his division's operations against this vital Japanese base. His valiant conduct in the face of fanatic opposition sustains and enhances the highest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service.


Thanks to Wikipedia for the info…

The Mount Rushmore of the Philadelphia Phillies

Mike Schmidt – Years with the Phillies: 1972 -1989

Phillies Highlights: World Series champion (1980)
World Series MVP (1980)
12× All-Star (1974, 1976, 1977, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1987, 1989)
8× NL home run champion (1974, 1975, 1976, 1980, 1981, 1983, 1984, 1986)
4× NL RBI champion (1980, 1981, 1984, 1986)
10× Gold Glove Award (1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1986)
6× Silver Slugger Award (1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1986)
3× NL MVP (1980, 1981, 1986)
#20 retired by the Philadelphia Phillies
Inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1995

Steve Carlton – Years with the Phillies: 1972 - 1986

Phillies Highlights: 10× All-Star (1968, 1969, 1971, 1972, 1974, 1977, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982)
2× World Series champion (1967, 1980)
Gold Glove Award winner (1981)
4× NL Cy Young Award winner (1972, 1977, 1980, 1982)
Philadelphia Phillies retired his #32
Inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1994

Jim Bunning – Years with the Phillies: 1964 – 1967, 1970 - 1971

Phillies Highlights: 2× All-Star (1964, 1966)
NL strikeout champion (1967)
Pitched a perfect game on June 21, 1964
#14 retired by the Philadelphia Phillies
Inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1996

Lenny Dykstra – Years with the Phillies: 1989 - 1996

Phillies Highlights: 3× All-Star (1990, 1994, 1995)
Silver Slugger Award winner (1993)
I thought long and hard about this last selection. It’s hard to leave a player like Robin Roberts off of this list but I just had to have Dykstra on here. This was the kind of player I loved being teammates with (and I was lucky enough to have a few Dykstra-like teammates over the years). Lenny Dykstra was the type of player who went all out all the time. He was kind of like Pete Rose (with fewer hits). You knew that if Lenny was in the game, he was giving everything he had.

Honorable Mention: Robin Roberts, Larry Bowa



The Mount Rushmore of the Colorado Rockies

Larry Walker – Years with the Rockies: 1995 - 2004

Rockies Highlights: 4× All-Star (1997, 1998, 1999, 2001)
5× Gold Glove Award winner (1997, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2002)
2× Silver Slugger Award winner (1997, 1999)
1997 NL MVP
3× NL batting title (1998, 1999, 2001)
1997 NL home run champion
Though not retired, his #33 hasn’t been worn since Walker was on the team.

Andres Galarraga – Years with the Rockies: 1993 - 1997

Rockies Highlights: 2× All-Star (1993, 1997)
Silver Slugger Award winner (1996)
NL Comeback Player of the Year (1993)
NL batting champion (1993)
NL home run champion (1996)
Inducted into the Venezuelan Baseball Hall of Fame in 2010
Galarraga was one of the first stars for the Rockies and had a nice run at a .400 batting average in 1993 (he ended up with a .370 batting average that season).

Dante Bichette – Years with the Rockies: 1993 - 1999

Rockies Highlights: 4× All-Star (1994, 1995, 1996, 1998)
Silver Slugger Award winner (1995)


Vinny Castilla - Years with the Rockies: 1993 – 1999, 2004, 2006

Rockies Highlights: 2× All-Star (1995, 1998)
3× Silver Slugger Award winner (1995, 1997, 1998)



Flashback Friday

Me and The Wife at her wedding

Allison and Leah

The Wife and me the day before her wedding I think

MaMa, my Labor Day Uncle DG, my Everyday Uncle Keith, Teresa Lynn and Aunt JoJo - same day as the above pic I think

Granny, Cougar, Allison, MaMa and Sonny

Mom, Granny and Aunt Yvonne - Pre wedding pic

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

Part XIII – The Mount Rushmore of … Mets/Pirates

Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Private Fitz Lee (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on June 30, 1898, at Tayabacoa, Cuba. His citation reads:

Voluntarily went ashore in the face of the enemy and aided in the rescue of his wounded comrades; this after several previous attempts had been frustrated.

Captain Howard V. Lee (US Marine Corps) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on August 8-9, 1966, near Cam Lo, Republic of Vietnam. His citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. A platoon of Maj. (then Capt.) Lee's company, while on an operation deep in enemy territory, was attacked and surrounded by a large Vietnamese force. Realizing that the unit had suffered numerous casualties, depriving it of effective leadership, and fully aware that the platoon was even then under heavy attack by the enemy, Maj Lee took 7 men and proceeded by helicopter to reinforce the beleaguered platoon. Maj. Lee disembarked from the helicopter with 2 of his men and, braving withering enemy fire, led them into the perimeter, where he fearlessly moved from position to position, directing and encouraging the overtaxed troops. The enemy then launched a massive attack with the full might of their forces. Although painfully wounded by fragments from an enemy grenade in several areas of his body, including his eye, Maj. Lee continued undauntedly throughout the night to direct the valiant defense, coordinate supporting fire, and apprise higher headquarters of the plight of the platoon. The next morning he collapsed from his wounds and was forced to relinquish command. However the small band of marines had held their position and repeatedly fought off many vicious enemy attacks for a grueling 6 hours until their evacuation was effected the following morning. Maj. Lee's actions saved his men from capture, minimized the loss of lives, and dealt the enemy a severe defeat. His indomitable fighting spirit, superb leadership, and great personal valor in the face of tremendous odds, reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the U.S. Naval Service.

Master Sergeant Hubert L. Lee (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on February 1, 1951, near Ip-ori, Korea. His citation reads:

M/Sgt. Lee, a member of Company I, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy. When his platoon was forced from its position by a numerically superior enemy force, and his platoon leader wounded, M/Sgt. Lee assumed command, regrouped the remnants of his unit, and led them in repeated assaults to regain the position. Within 25 yards of his objective he received a leg wound from grenade fragments, but refused assistance and continued the attack. Although forced to withdraw 5 times, each time he regrouped his remaining men and renewed the assault. Moving forward at the head of his small group in the fifth attempt, he was struck by an exploding grenade, knocked to the ground, and seriously wounded in both legs. Still refusing assistance, he advanced by crawling, rising to his knees to fire, and urging his men to follow. While thus directing the final assault he was wounded a third time, by small-arms fire. Persistently continuing to crawl forward, he directed his men in a final and successful attack which regained the vital objective. His intrepid leadership and determination led to the destruction of 83 of the enemy and withdrawal of the remainder, and was a vital factor in stopping the enemy attack. M/Sgt. Lee's indomitable courage, consummate valor, and outstanding leadership reflect the highest credit upon himself and are in keeping with the finest traditions of the infantry and the U.S. Army.


Thanks to Wikipedia for the info…

The Mount Rushmore of the New York Mets

Tom Seaver – Years with the Mets: 1967 – 1977, 1983

Highlights with the team: 10× All-Star (1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1976, 1977)
1967 NL Rookie of the Year
World Series champion (1969)
3× NL Cy Young Award winner (1969, 1973, 1975)
Pitched a no-hitter on June 16, 1978
#41 retired by the New York Mets
Inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1992.

Gary Carter – Years with the Mets: 1985 - 1989

Highlights with the team: 4× All-Star (1985, 1986, 1987, 1988)
World Series champion (1986)
2× Silver Slugger Award winner (1985, 1986)
Inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2003.

Dwight Gooden – Years with the Mets: 1984 - 1994

Highlights with the team: 4× All-Star (1984, 1985, 1986, 1988)
NL Rookie of the Year (1984)
World Series champion (1986)
Silver Slugger Award winner (1992)
NL Cy Young Award (1985)
Triple Crown (1985)
Dwight Gooden was one of the most dominating pitchers when he first started. I can only imagine what he could have done without drugs (real drugs… not PEDs).

Mike Piazza – Years with the Mets: 1998 - 2005

Highlights with the team: 7× All-Star (1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005)
5× Silver Slugger Award winner (1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002)

Honorable Mention: Darryl Strawberry


The Mount Rushmore of the Pittsburgh Pirates

Roberto Clemente – Years with the Pirates: 1955 - 1972

Highlights with the team: 15× All-Star games (1960(x2), 1961(x2), 1962(x2), 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972)
2× World Series champion (1960, 1971)
12× Gold Glove Award (1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972)
4× NL batting title (1961, 1964, 1965, 1967)
NL MVP (1966)
World Series MVP (1971)
#21 retired by the Pittsburgh Pirates
Inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1973

Honus Wagner – Years with the Pirates: 1900 - 1917

Highlights with the team: World Series Champion (1909)
National League Champion (1901, 1902)
NL Batting Champion (1900, 1903, 1904, 1906, 1907, 1908, 1909, 1911)
#33 retired by the Pittsburgh Pirates
Inducted in the first Baseball Hall of Fame class in 1936

Willie Stargell – Years with the Pirates: 1962 - 1982

Highlights with the team: 7× All-Star (1964, 1965, 1966, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1978)
2× World Series champion (1971, 1979)
NL MVP (1979)
World Series MVP (1979)
2× NL home run champion (1971, 1973)
NL RBI champion (1973)
NLCS MVP (1979)
#8 retired by the Pittsburgh Pirates
Inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1988

Barry Bonds - Years with the Pirates: 1986 - 1992

Highlights with the team: 2× All-Star (1990, 1992)
3× Gold Glove Award winner (1990, 1991, 1992)
3× Silver Slugger Award winner (1990, 1991, 1992)
2× NL MVP (1990, 1992)
Barry Bonds was a far better all-around player while with the Pirates than he was later in his career with the Giants when all he cared about was home runs.

Honorable Mention: Ralph Kiner, Bill Mazeroski


A quick look at the House of Greg brackets shows that our current rankings are:

1. Mary Ruth – 9 of 16 teams remaining (2 Final Four teams still in it, including Champ) – Also worth noting that MR did have Florida Gulf Coast in the Sweet 16.
2. Greg – 8 of 16 teams remaining (3 Final Four teams still in it, including both Championship Game teams).
3. The Wife – 6 of 16 teams remaining (3 Final Four teams still in it, including both Championship Game teams).
4. Susie – 6 of 16 teams remaining (2 Final Four teams still in it, including Runner-Up).
5. Daniel – 6 of 16 teams remaining (2 Final Four teams still in it, including Champ).


Picture Tuesday





Thanks to my good friend KC for letting me use this video... by the way, KC, can I please use this video?  You'll see Susie in the middle of the front row next to her future hubby Wyatt.  For the record, I thought Wyatt did a great job for only having one practice under his belt. He decided to go up there and let his big sister (Aubrey... on the other side of him) and Susie do all of the moving and singing.



Mary Ruth also sang in church this past Sunday.  She is on the front row (on the left).  They did a great job singing a song that wasn't easy.

Daniel swinging at his party...

All Susie needs is a swing and she's happy...

Daniel and his little Mickey Mouse cupcake


Susie loved her cupcake

Susie and Mary Ruth take a second out of fighting to come together for a picture...

It looked like Lucas liked the cupcake...

Me and Daniel wearing our Mickey Mouse shirts

Daniel and Lucas about to go down the slide

Mary Ruth is on the front row on the left

Sorry for the blurry pic... Susie is in the middle on the front row

Sunday, March 24, 2013

HAPPY BIRTHDAY DANIEL!! and Part XII – The Mount Rushmore of … Reds/Twins

Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Private Cornelius J. Leahy (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on September 3, 1899, near Porac, Luzon, Philippine Islands. His citation reads:

Distinguished gallantry in action in driving off a superior force and with the assistance of 1 comrade brought from the field of action the bodies of 2 comrades, 1 killed and the other severely wounded, this while on a scout.

Quartermaster Nicholas Lear (US Navy) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on December 24-25, 1864 and January 13-15, 1865, on board the USS New Ironsides. His citation reads:

Lear served on board the U.S.S. New Ironsides during action in several attacks on Fort Fisher, 24 and 25 December 1864; and 13, 14, and 15 January 1865. The ship steamed in and took the lead in the ironclad division close inshore and immediately opened its starboard battery in a barrage of well-directed fire to cause several fires and explosions and dismount several guns during the first 2 days of fighting. Taken under fire as she steamed into position on 13 January, the New Ironsides fought all day and took on ammunition at night despite severe weather conditions. When the enemy came out of his bombproofs to defend the fort against the storming party, the ship's battery disabled nearly every gun on the fort facing the shore before the cease-fire order was given by the flagship.

First Lieutenant Daniel W. Lee (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on September 2, 1944, at Montreval, France. His citation reads:

1st Lt. (then 2d Lt. ) Daniel W. Lee was leader of Headquarters Platoon, Troop A, 117th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron, Mechanized, at Montreval, France, on 2 September 1944, when the Germans mounted a strong counterattack, isolating the town and engaging its outnumbered defenders in a pitched battle. After the fight had raged for hours and our forces had withstood heavy shelling and armor-supported infantry attacks, 2d Lt. Lee organized a patrol to knock out mortars which were inflicting heavy casualties on the beleaguered reconnaissance troops. He led the small group to the edge of the town, sweeping enemy riflemen out of position on a ridge from which he observed 7 Germans manning 2 large mortars near an armored half-track about 100 yards down the reverse slope. Armed with a rifle and grenades, he left his men on the high ground and crawled to within 30 yards of the mortars, where the enemy discovered him and unleashed machine-pistol fire which shattered his right thigh. Scorning retreat, bleeding and suffering intense pain, he dragged himself relentlessly forward He killed 5 of the enemy with rifle fire and the others fled before he reached their position. Fired on by an armored car, he took cover behind the German half-track and there found a panzerfaust with which to neutralize this threat. Despite his wounds, he inched his way toward the car through withering machinegun fire, maneuvering into range, and blasted the vehicle with a round from the rocket launcher, forcing it to withdraw. Having cleared the slope of hostile troops, he struggle back to his men, where he collapsed from pain and loss of blood. 2d Lt. Lee's outstanding gallantry, willing risk of life, and extreme tenacity of purpose in coming to grips with the enemy, although suffering from grievous wounds, set an example of bravery and devotion to duty in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.


HAPPY 2nd BIRTHDAY DANIEL!!!!!! He’s a great little boy and I’m lucky to have him. Of all of my children, he’s loved me earlier than the others (it took about 3 years for the others). He’s still a mommy’s boy, of course… but he loves me too sometimes. I guess we don’t have a baby in the house anymore…


Thanks to Wikipedia for the info…

The Mount Rushmore of the Cincinnati Reds

Pete Rose – Pete Rose is one of the greatest hitters of all time. Years with the Reds: 1963-1978 and 1984-1986 Highlights with the team: 2× World Series champion (1975, 1976)
NL MVP (1973)
World Series MVP (1975)
3× National League Batting Champion (1968, 1969, 1973)
13× All-Star (1965, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1985)
2× Gold Glove Award (1969, 1970)
NL Rookie of the Year (1963)
MLB Records
4,256 career hits
3,562 career games played
14,053 career at-bats
Due to a MLB ban, Pete’s #14 has not been retired by the Reds (though it hasn’t been worn by anyone since he played) and he is not in the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Johnny Bench – Johnny Bench is one of the greatest catchers of all time. Years with the Reds: 1967 – 1983

Highlights with the team: 14× All-Star (1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1983)
2× World Series champion (1975, 1976)
10× Gold Glove Award winner (1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977)
2× NL MVP (1970, 1972)
1968 NL Rookie of the Year
1976 World Series MVP
The Cincinnati Reds have retired his #5.
He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1989.

Joe Morgan – Joe Morgan is one of the greatest second basemen of all time. Years with the Reds: 1972 – 1979

Highlights with the team: 8× All-Star (1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979)
2× World Series champion (1975, 1976)
5× Gold Glove Award winner (1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977)
2× NL MVP (1975, 1976)
The Cincinnati Reds have retired his #8.
He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1990.

Barry Larkin – Years with the Reds: 1986 – 2004

Highlights with the team: 12× All-Star (1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2004)
World Series champion (1990)
3× Gold Glove Award winner (1994, 1995, 1996)
9× Silver Slugger Award winner (1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1995, 1996, 1998, 1999)
1995 NL MVP
The Cincinnati Reds have retired his #11.
He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2012.

Honorable Mention: Tony Perez, Dave Concepcion, Chris Sabo, Eric Davis and Rob Dibble


The Mount Rushmore of the Minnesota Twins

Note that some of the players on this team played for the Washington Senators. The Senators moved to Minnesota and became the Twins around 1960.

Kirby Puckett – Years with the Twins: 1984 – 1995

Highlights with the team: 10× All-Star (1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995)
2× World Series champion (1987, 1991)
6× Gold Glove Award (1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1991, 1992)
6× Silver Slugger Award (1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1992, 1994)
AL batting title (1989)
AL RBI champion (1994)
ALCS MVP (1991)
His #34 has been retired by the Minnesota Twins.
He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2001.

Harmon Killebrew – Years with the Senators/Twins: 1954 – 1974

Highlights with the team: 13× All-Star (1959(x2), 1961(x2), 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971)
AL MVP (1969)
6× AL home run champion (1959, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1967, 1969)
3× AL RBI champion (1962, 1969, 1971)
The Minnesota Twins have retired his #3.
He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1984.

Walter Johnson – Years with the Senators: 1907 – 1927

Highlights with the team: Pitched a no-hitter (July 1, 1920)
2× AL MVP (1913, 1924)
World Series champion (1924)
11 sub-2.00 ERA seasons
2 30-win seasons
12 20-win seasons
12× American League Strikeout Champion (1910, 1912-1919, 1921, 1923, 1924)
6× American League Wins Champion (1913-1916, 1918, 1924)
5× American League ERA Champion (1912, 1913, 1918, 1919, 1924)
3× Triple Crown (1913, 1918, 1924)
All-time major league leader in shutouts
Second all-time in wins
Walter was one of the first five inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1936.

Rod Carew - Years with the Twins: 1967 – 1978

Highlights with the team: 12× All-Star selection (1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978)
7× AL batting title (1969, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1977, 1978)
1977 AL MVP
1967 AL Rookie of the Year
The Minnesota Twins have retired his #29.
He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1991.


The I’m just sayin… Proverb of the Week
Proverbs 10:1

A wise son brings joy to his father,
   but a foolish son brings grief to his mother.

Friday, March 22, 2013

Part XI – The Mount Rushmore of … White Sox/Marlins

Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Captain Henry W. Lawton (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on August 3, 1864, at Atlanta, Georgia. His citation reads:

Led a charge of skirmishers against the enemy's rifle pits and stubbornly and successfully resisted 2 determined attacks of the enemy to retake the works.

Sergeant John S. Lawton (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on September 29, 1879, at Milk River, Colorado. His citation reads:

Coolness and steadiness under fire; volunteered to accompany a small detachment on a very dangerous mission.

First Lieutenant Louis B. Lawton (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on July 13, 1900, at Tientsin, China. His citation reads:

Carried a message and guided reinforcements across a wide and fireswept space, during which he was thrice wounded.


Thanks to Wikipedia for the info…

The Mount Rushmore of the Chicago White Sox

Frank Thomas – I don’t know if Frank Thomas is the best player on this list, but he’s the first guy I think of when I think of the White Sox. Years with the White Sox: 1990 – 2005

Highlights: 5× All-Star (1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997)
4× Silver Slugger Award winner (1991, 1993, 1994, 2000)
2× AL MVP (1993, 1994)
1997 AL batting title
2000 AL Comeback Player of the Year
1995 Home Run Derby champion
The Chicago White Sox have retired his #35.

Shoeless Joe Jackson – A native of Pickens County, South Carolina, Shoeless Joe Jackson is perhaps the most controversial of the guys on this list. Years with the White Sox: 1915 – 1920. He was part of the 1917 World Series Championship team and has the third highest career batting average (.356). He ended his career with 1,772 hits, 54 home runs and 785 RBIs. While his ban from MLB (due to the 1918 Black Sox scandal) is keeping him out of the Baseball Hall of Fame, it will not keep him off of my list.

Nellie Fox – Years with the White Sox: 1950 – 1963

Highlights with the team: 1959 AL MVP
15× All-Star (1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959 (x2), 1960 (x2), 1961 (x2), 1963)
3× Gold Glove Award (1957, 1959, 1960)
His #2 has been retired by the Chicago White Sox

Carlton Fisk – Years with the White Sox: 1981 – 1993

Highlights with the team: 4× All-Star (1981, 1982, 1985, 1991)
Gold Glove Award winner (1972)
3× Silver Slugger Award winner (1981, 1985, 1988)
The White Sox have retired his #72


The Mount Rushmore of the Miami Marlins

Jeff Conine – Years with the Marlins: 1993 – 1997 and 2003 - 2005

Highlights with the team: 2× All-Star (1994, 1995)
2× World Series champion (1997, 2003)
1995 MLB All-Star Game MVP

Josh Beckett – Years with the Marlins: 2001 - 2005

Highlights with the team: World Series champion (2003)
World Series MVP (2003)

Charles Johnson – Years with the Marlins: 1994 – 1998 and 2001 - 2002

Highlights with the team: 2× All-Star selection (1997, 2001)
World Series champion (1997)
4× Gold Glove Award winner (1995, 1996, 1997, 1998)

Derrek Lee - Years with the Marlins: 1998 - 2003

Highlights with the team: World Series Champion (2003)
3× Gold Glove Award winner (2003)

I admit my Marlins picks might not be the greatest ever. I’m pretty firm on Jeff Conine and, in my mind, Beckett pitched out of his mind during the 2003 playoffs (PLAYOFFS!?). Charles Johnson was a great catcher and Derrek Lee was a great first baseman. There’s a chance I’m forgetting someone, but the Marlins don’t really have a “deep” history since they haven’t been around that long and they trade all of their good players after they win a World Series (usually). So that didn’t help me pick for this team. Anyway, head over to Sonny’Side to see if my brother did a better job than me on this team.

Check back on Sunday for the Reds and the Twins… that should be fun.


Flashback Friday
Me and Austin

Mom and Granny

Austin

Ansley

Leah

Meredith

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

Part X – The Mount Rushmore of … Tigers/Padres

Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Staff Sergeant Robert E. Laws (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on January 12, 1945, at Pangasinan Province, Luzon, Philippine Islands. His citation reads:

He led the assault squad when Company G attacked enemy hill positions. The enemy force, estimated to be a reinforced infantry company, was well supplied with machineguns, ammunition, grenades, and blocks of TNT and could be attacked only across a narrow ridge 70 yards long. At the end of this ridge an enemy pillbox and rifle positions were set in rising ground. Covered by his squad, S/Sgt Laws traversed the hogback through vicious enemy fire until close to the pillbox, where he hurled grenades at the fortification. Enemy grenades wounded him, but he persisted in his assault until 1 of his missiles found its mark and knocked out the pillbox. With more grenades, passed to him by members of his squad who had joined him, he led the attack on the entrenched riflemen. In the advance up the hill, he suffered additional wounds in both arms and legs, about the body and in the head, as grenades and TNT charges exploded near him. Three Japs rushed him with fixed bayonets, and he emptied the magazine of his machine pistol at them, killing 2. He closed in hand-to-hand combat with the third, seizing the Jap's rifle as he met the onslaught. The 2 fell to the ground and rolled some 50 or 60 feet down a bank. When the dust cleared the Jap lay dead and the valiant American was climbing up the hill with a large gash across the head. He was given first aid and evacuated from the area while his squad completed the destruction of the enemy position. S/Sgt. Laws' heroic actions provided great inspiration to his comrades, and his courageous determination, in the face of formidable odds and while suffering from multiple wounds, enabled them to secure an important objective with minimum casualties.

First Sergeant Gaines Lawson (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on October 3, 1863, at Minville, Tennessee. His citation reads:

Went to the aid of a wounded comrade between the lines and carried him to a place of safety.

Landsman John Lawson (US Navy) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on August 5, 1864, on board the U.S.S. Hartford. His citation reads:

On board the flagship U.S.S. Hartford during successful attacks against Fort Morgan, rebel gunboats and the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay on 5 August 1864. Wounded in the leg and thrown violently against the side of the ship when an enemy shell killed or wounded the 6-man crew as the shell whipped on the berth deck, Lawson, upon regaining his composure, promptly returned to his station and, although urged to go below for treatment, steadfastly continued his duties throughout the remainder of the action.


Thanks to Wikipedia for the info…

The Mount Rushmore of the Detroit Tigers

Ty Cobb – Ty Cobb played for the Detroit Tigers from 1905 – 1926 (with a break in 1918 to serve in the Army as a Captain on the Western Front during the Original World War). Some of his highlights include:

1911 AL MVP
.366 career batting average (highest ever)
54 career steals of home (most all time)
Won 12 batting titles, including 9 in a row from 1907 to 1915. (most all time)
Fourth all time in stolen bases with 892 (first all time in stealing home 54 times)
Batted under .320 only once in his career
Batted over .400 three times (tied for MLB record)
In 1936 Cobb received the most votes of any player on the inaugural Baseball Hall of Fame ballot, receiving 222 out of a possible 226 votes. If he had worn a number, it would be retired by the Tigers.

Hank Greenberg – The Hebrew Hammer played for the Tigers in 1930, 1933 – 1946 with about a 45 month break to serve in WWII (World War the Sequel). His highlights include:

5× All-Star (1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1945)
2× World Series champion (1935, 1945)
2× AL MVP (1935, 1940)
The Detroit Tigers retired his #5. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1956.

Al Kaline – Al played for the Tigers from 1953 – 1974. His highlights include:

18× All-Star (1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959 (x2), 1960 (x2), 1961 (x2), 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1971, 1974)
World Series champion (1968)
10× Gold Glove Award winner (1957, 1958, 1959, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967)
His #6 has been retired by the Tigers. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1980.

Alan Trammell – Alan Trammell played for the Tigers from 1977 – 1996. His highlights include:

6× All-Star (1980, 1984, 1985, 1987, 1988, 1990)
AL Comeback Player of the Year (1983)
World Series champion (1984)
World Series MVP (1984)
4× Gold Glove Award (1980, 1981, 1983, 1984)
3× Silver Slugger Award (1987, 1988, 1990)

Honorable Mention: Hal Newhouser, Charlie Gehringer, Kirk Gibson, Willie Horton


The Mount Rushmore of the San Diego Padres

Tony Gwynn – Tony played for the Padres from 1982 -2001. His highlights include:

8× NL batting champion (1984, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997)
15× All-Star (1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999)
7× Silver Slugger Award (1984, 1986, 1987, 1989, 1994, 1995, 1997)
5× Gold Glove Award (1986, 1987, 1989, 1990, 1991)
The San Diego Padres have retired his #19. Tony was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2007. Honestly, we could just have Tony Gwynn on the list and leave it at that. When it comes to the Padres, there is a HUGE gap between #1 (Gwynn) and the rest of the pack. But since we said we’d have 4 players for each team, I guess I’ll continue the list…

Dave Winfield – Don’t misunderstand my above statement… Dave Winfield is a great player… but he was great on other teams, too. In fact, Dave Winfield was a great all-around athlete. After college, he was drafted by the San Diego Padres (MLB), the Atlanta Hawks (NBA), the Utah Stars (ABA) and the Minnesota Vikings (NFL). Anyway, Dave played for the Padres from 1973 -1980. His highlights with the team include:

4× All-Star (1977, 1978, 1979, 1980)
2× Gold Glove Award winner (1979, 1980)
The San Diego Padres have retired his #31. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2001.

Steve Garvey – Steve Garvey played for the Padres from 1983 – 1987. His highlights with the team include:

2× All-Star (1984, 1985)
NLCS MVP (1984)
His #6 has been retired by the Padres.

Randy Jones - Randy played for the Padres from 1973 – 1980. His highlights include:

2× All-Star (1975, 1976)
1975 NL Comeback Player of the Year
1976 NL Cy Young Award
The Padres have retired his #35.

Remember to check out Sonny’Side to see if he made as bad of a mistake as he made on his Giants list. FYI… I called Sonny on Sunday to let him know it looked like his blog had been hacked. Come to find out, he really did put Bonds on his list over McCovey. Unfreakinbelievable…

This Friday we’ll be looking at the White Sox and the Marlins.


I hope you had a productive day at work yesterday filling out your brackets. I’m entering a tournament pool with me, The Wife, Mary Ruth, Susie and Daniel… I do not expect to win. I’ll let you know how it turns out… Here's a look at our brackets...



It wasn't easy getting his picks... but Daniel really loves Ohio State and Georgetown... at least, those were the teams he seemed to get excited about.


Susie loves Butler's name... she would say "Butt-ler" and giggle each time.  She'll probably win...




Picture Tuesday

The Wife and Mary Ruth were sick last week with the flu, so I had to take Susie and Daniel with me to Target to get some meds and other stuff... Daniel was starting to fuss, so Susie told him to "honk" her nose.

Daniel ready to eat what his daddy fixed him...

Daniel being goofy...

Still goofy...

We had to go to Lowe's to get a fan for our den and some sand for our sand box...

Susie was a good big sister holding Daniel's hand so he wouldn't run away...

I guess she can be goofy too...

Sunday, March 17, 2013

Part IX – The Mount Rushmore of … Giants/Rays

Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Specialist Fourth Class Robert D. Law (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on February 22, 1969, at Tinh Phuoc Thanh province, Republic of Vietnam. His citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. Sp4c. Law distinguished himself while serving with Company 1. While on a long-range reconnaissance patrol in Tinh Phuoc Thanh province, Sp4c. Law and 5 comrades made contact with a small enemy patrol. As the opposing elements exchanged intense fire, he maneuvered to a perilously exposed position flanking his comrades and began placing suppressive fire on the hostile troops. Although his team was hindered by a low supply of ammunition and suffered from an unidentified irritating gas in the air, Sp4c. Law's spirited defense and challenging counterassault rallied his fellow soldiers against the well-equipped hostile troops. When an enemy grenade landed in his team's position, Sp4c. Law, instead of diving into the safety of a stream behind him, threw himself on the grenade to save the lives of his comrades. Sp4c. Law's extraordinary courage and profound concern for his fellow soldiers were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on himself, his unit, and the U.S. Army.

First Lieutenant William R. Lawley, Jr. (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on February 20, 1944, over Europe. His citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action above and beyond the call of duty, 20 February 1944, while serving as pilot of a B-17 aircraft on a heavy bombardment mission over enemy-occupied continental Europe. Coming off the target he was attacked by approximately 20 enemy fighters, shot out of formation, and his plane severely crippled. Eight crewmembers were wounded, the copilot was killed by a 20-mm. shell. One engine was on fire, the controls shot away, and 1st Lt. Lawley seriously and painfully wounded about the face. Forcing the copilot's body off the controls, he brought the plane out of a steep dive, flying with his left hand only. Blood covered the instruments and windshield and visibility was impossible. With a full bomb load the plane was difficult to maneuver and bombs could not be released because the racks were frozen. After the order to bail out had been given, 1 of the waist gunners informed the pilot that 2 crewmembers were so severely wounded that it would be impossible for them to bail out. With the fire in the engine spreading, the danger of an explosion was imminent. Because of the helpless condition of his wounded crewmembers 1st Lt. Lawley elected to remain with the ship and bring them to safety if it was humanly possible, giving the other crewmembers the option of bailing out. Enemy fighters again attacked but by using masterful evasive action he managed to lose them. One engine again caught on fire and was extinguished by skillful flying. 1st Lt. Lawley remained at his post, refusing first aid until he collapsed from sheer exhaustion caused by loss of blood, shock, and the energy he had expended in keeping control of his plane. He was revived by the bombardier and again took over the controls. Coming over the English coast 1 engine ran out of gasoline and had to be feathered. Another engine started to burn and continued to do so until a successful crash landing was made on a small fighter base. Through his heroism and exceptional flying skill, 1st Lt. Lawley rendered outstanding distinguished and valorous service to our Nation.

Private James Lawrence (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions from August to October 1868, in Arizona. His citation reads:

Bravery in scouts and actions against Indians.


Thanks to Wikipedia for the info…

The Mount Rushmore of the San Francisco Giants

Willie Mays – Mays is one of those guys in the “greatest of all time” discussion. He played for the Giants from 1951 – 1972 (with a break in there for military service during the Korean War). He was traded around the beginning of the 1972 season, so I won’t include it in his awards that I list. During his time with the Giants, he was a 22 time All-Star (1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959 (x2), 1960 (x2), 1961 (x2), 1962 (x2), 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971) and a 12 time Gold Glove Award winner (1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968). His Giants won the World Series in 1954. He was the NL Rookie of the Year (1951) and a two time NL MVP (1954, 1965). He ended his time with the Giants with a .304 batting average, 3,187 hits (including 646 home runs). The San Francisco Giants have retired his #24. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1979.

Willie McCovey – McCovey played for the Giants from 1959 – 1973. He was the 1959 NL Rookie of the Year and a six time All-Star selection (1963, 1966, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971). He was also the 1969 NL MVP. His #44 has been retired by the San Francisco Giants. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1986. Here’s the main thing you need to know about Willie McCovey… Bob Gibson called him "the scariest hitter in baseball".

Mel Ott – Mel played for the Giants from 1926 – 1947. He was a twelve time All-Star (1934, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945) and a part of the 1933 World Series championship team. The Giants have retired his #4. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1951.

Christy Mathewson – Christy Mathewson is considered one of the greatest pitchers of all time. He played for the Giants from 1900 – 1916. Some of his highlights include: World Series champion (1905), 373 career wins, 2.13 career ERA, Won 20 games or more 13 times, won 30 games or more 4 times. He also pitched 79 shutouts and 435 complete games out of 552 games started. Mathewson won the NL Pitcher's Triple Crown in 1905 and 1908. If they had used numbers when he played, the Giants would have retired it. He was one of the first 5 people inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. While it didn’t interrupt his playing time with the Giants, I’d like to point out that he served as a Captain in the Army during WWI (The Original World War).

Honorable Mention: Orlando Cepeda, Gaylord Perry, Will Clark, Kevin Mitchell, Mitch Williams


The Mount Rushmore of the Tampa Bay Rays

Carlos Pena – Carlos played for the Rays from 2007 – 2010. He won the Silver Slugger Award and AL Comeback Player of the Year Award in 2007. He was a Gold Glove Award winner (2008) and All-Star (2009) while with the team. He is the Rays All-Time Home Run Leader.

Carl Crawford – Carl played for the Rays from 2002 – 2010. He was a four time All-Star selection (2004, 2007, 2009, 2010) as well as a Gold Glove Award winner (2010) and Silver Slugger Award winner (2010). He was a four time AL Stolen Base Champion (2003, 2004, 2006, 2007). He tied an MLB record with 6 stolen bases in a game (May 3, 2009 vs. Boston Red Sox).

Evan Longoria – Evan has played for the Rays since 2008. He was the AL Rookie of the Year in 2008. He has been a three time All-Star selection (2008, 2009, 2010), two time two time Gold Glove Award winner (2009, 2010) and a Silver Slugger Award winner (2009).

James Shields - Shields played for the Rays from 2006 – 2012. He was an All-Star in 2011. He has 1,250 strikeouts and was the first (and so far, only) pitcher to win a World Series game for the Rays.

Check out Sonny’Side to see who my big brother thinks belongs on these lists.

Coming up Tuesday: Tigers and Padres


The I’m just sayin… Proverb of the Week
Proverbs 9:11

For through wisdom your days will be many,
    and years will be added to your life.

Friday, March 15, 2013

Part VIII – The Mount Rushmore of … A’s/Diamondbacks

Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Sergeant John Cridland Latham (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on September 29, 1918, near Le Catelet, France. His citation reads:

Becoming separated from their platoon by a smoke barrage, Sgt. Latham, Sgt. Alan L. Eggers, and Cpl. Thomas E. O'Shea took cover in a shellhole well within the enemy's lines. Upon hearing a call for help from an American tank which had become disabled 30 yards from them, the 3 soldiers left their shelter and started toward the tank under heavy fire from German machineguns and trench mortars. In crossing the fire-swept area, Cpl. O'Shea was mortally wounded, but his companions, undeterred, proceeded to the tank, rescued a wounded officer, and assisted 2 wounded soldiers to cover in the sap of a nearby trench. Sgts. Latham and Eggers then returned to the tank in the face of the violent fire, dismounted a Hotchkiss gun, and took it back to where the wounded men were keeping off the enemy all day by effective use of the gun and later bringing it with the wounded men back to our lines under cover of darkness.

Private First Class Billy Lane Lauffer (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on September 21, 1966, Near Bon Son in Binh Dinh province, Republic of Vietnam. His citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. Pfc. Lauffer's squad, a part of Company C, was suddenly struck at close range by an intense machine gun crossfire from 2 concealed bunkers astride the squad's route. Pfc. Lauffer, the second man in the column, saw the lead man fall and noted that the remainder of the squad was unable to move. Two comrades, previously wounded and being carried on litters, were Lying helpless in the beaten zone of the enemy fire. Reacting instinctively, Pfc. Lauffer quickly engaged both bunkers with fire from his rifle, but when the other squad members attempted to maneuver under his covering fire, the enemy fusillade increased in volume and thwarted every attempt to move. Seeing this and his wounded comrades helpless in the open, Pfc. Lauffer rose to his feet and charged the enemy machine gun positions, firing his weapon and drawing the enemy's attention. Keeping the enemy confused and off balance, his 1-man assault provided the crucial moments for the wounded point man to crawl to a covered position, the squad to move the exposed litter patients to safety, and his comrades to gain more advantageous positions. Pfc. Lauffer was fatally wounded during his selfless act of courage and devotion to his fellow soldiers. His gallantry at the cost of his life served as an inspiration to his comrades and saved the lives of an untold number of his companions. His actions are in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the U.S. Army.

First Class Fireman John Laverty (US Navy) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on September 14, 1881, on board the U.S.S. Alaska. His citation reads:

Serving on board the U.S.S. Alaska at Callao Bay, Peru, 14 September 1881. Following the rupture of the stop-valve chamber on that vessel, Laverty hauled the fires from under the boiler.


Thanks to Wikipedia for the info…

The Mount Rushmore of the Oakland A’s

Rickey Henderson – Rickey played for the A’s from 1979 – 1984, 1989 – 1993, 1994 – 1995 and 1998. I’m going to tell you something that anyone who ever saw Rickey Henderson play knows… He’s the greatest leadoff hitter ever. E-V-E-R. He holds the record for most games led off with a home run (81). Think about that… 81 times he was the first batter up and before the 2nd batter came up, his team had 1 run on the board. I’m not sure how many of those 81 times came with the A’s, but my guess is a lot. As for his A’s specific stats, he was walked 1,227 times… and he stole 867 bases. Here’s the thing my non-baseball readers need to understand, Rickey Henderson didn’t become the All-Time leader in Steals on accident. He didn’t just stick around long enough and “happen” to get that record. It was known early on that he would either own the record one day or at least make a hard push for it. He had 3 different seasons with the A’s where he had over 100 stolen bases (100 in 1980, 130 in 1982 and 108 in 1983). You also need to understand that pitchers hate having a base stealer on base. It throws everything off for them. So the last thing they would ever want is for Rickey to get on base… yet at the time of his retirement he held the record for walks. While with the A’s, he was a six time All-Star (1980, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1990, 1991), a Gold Glove Award winner (1981), a two time Silver Slugger Award winner (1981, 1990) and a World Series champion (1989). He was the ALCS MVP in 1989 and the AL MVP in 1990. He was a 8 time AL stolen base champion (1980–1984, 1989–1991). His #24 has been retired by the Oakland Athletics. Rickey was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2009.

Dennis Eckersley – Eckersley played for the A’s from 1987 – 1995. He was a 4 time All-Star (1988, 1990, 1991, 1992), World Series champion (1989), AL MVP and Cy Young Award winner (both in 1992), ALCS MVP (1988) and two time AL Rolaids Relief Man of the Year (1988, 1992). He was considered the most dominant closer from 1988 – 1992. In the 1990 season, he had an ERA of 0.61 and, in fact, had more saves (48) than base runners allowed (45)! The A’s have retired his #43. In 2004 he was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Rollie Fingers – Rollie Fingers played for the A’s from 1968 – 1976. He was a four time All-Star (1973, 1974, 1975, 1976) while with the team and helped them win three straight World Series championships (1972, 1973, 1974). He was the 1974 World Series MVP. The A’s have retired his #34 and he was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1992.

Catfish Hunter – Catfish played for the A’s from 1965 – 1974. He was a six time All-Star (1966, 1967, 1970, 1972, 1973, 1974) and also a member of three straight World Series championship teams (1972, 1973, 1974). He won the AL Cy Young Award in 1974 and pitched a perfect game on May 8, 1968. The A’s have retired his #27. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1987.


The Mount Rushmore of the Arizona Diamondbacks

The Diamondbacks are a relatively new organization and, therefore, don’t have a lot of long-time stars to pick from like some of the other teams have. So, I’ll do the best I can with what I have to work with.

Luis Gonzalez – Luis Gonzalez played for the Diamondbacks from 1999 – 2006. During this time he was a five time All-Star selection (1999, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005), a Silver Slugger Award winner (2001) and a World Series champion (2001). The Arizona Diamondbacks retired his #20.

Randy Johnson – The Big Unit played for the Diamondbacks from 1999 – 2004 and 2007 – 2008. He was a five time All-Star (1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004) and four time Cy Young Award winner (1999, 2000, 2001, 2002) while on the team. He was a World Series champion (2001) and World Series Co-MVP (2001). He also won the Triple Crown (2002) and pitched a perfect game on May 18, 2004.

Curt Schilling – Curt Schilling played for the Diamondbacks from 2000 – 2003. He was an All-Star twice while with the team (2001, 2002), a World Series champion (2001) and a World Series Co-MVP (2001). He was second in 2001 and 2002 in the Cy Young voting (behind teammate Randy Johnson).

Mark Grace - Mark Grace played for the Diamondbacks from 2001 – 2003. Grace played a big role in helping the Diamondbacks win the World Series in 2001. He was responsible for leading off the bottom of the 9th inning with a single off Yankee pitcher Mariano Rivera which rallied the Arizona Diamondbacks to an improbable come-from-behind victory in Game 7. His .515 batting average in League Championship Series play is a record for players in at least 10 games. While he was never really a home run threat (which was rare for a first baseman in the steroid era… or really any era for that matter), Grace was great at hitting doubles and being a great base runner (especially being able to go from first to third on a base hit). He was able to do the “little things” to make his team better.

Don’t forget to go over to Sonny’Side to see who Sonny has on his lists.

Coming Sunday: The Giants and the Rays.


Flashback Friday

Mary Ruth with Teddy

Ansley and Leah

Ansley, Meredith and Leah

Meredith, Leah and Ansley

Leah and Allison

Austin


Tuesday, March 12, 2013

Part VII – The Mount Rushmore of … Orioles/Nationals

Know Your Medal of Honor Recipients:

Farrier David Larkin (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on September 29, 1872, at Red River, Texas. His citation reads:

Gallantry in action.

Corporal James W. Larrabee (US Army) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on May 22, 1863, at Vicksburg, Mississippi. His citation reads:

Gallantry in the charge of the "volunteer storming party."

Lieutenant Clyde Everett Lassen (US Navy) received his Medal of Honor for his actions on June 19, 1968, in the Republic of Vietnam. His citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as pilot and aircraft commander of a search and rescue helicopter, attached to Helicopter Support Squadron 7, during operations against enemy forces in North Vietnam. Launched shortly after midnight to attempt the rescue of 2 downed aviators, Lt. (then Lt. (J.G.)) Lassen skillfully piloted his aircraft over unknown and hostile terrain to a steep, tree-covered hill on which the survivors had been located. Although enemy fire was being directed at the helicopter, he initially landed in a clear area near the base of the hill, but, due to the dense undergrowth, the survivors could not reach the helicopter. With the aid of flare illumination, Lt. Lassen successfully accomplished a hover between 2 trees at the survivors' position Illumination was abruptly lost as the last of the flares were expended, and the helicopter collided with a tree, commencing a sharp descent. Expertly righting his aircraft and maneuvering clear, Lt. Lassen remained in the area, determined to make another rescue attempt, and encouraged the downed aviators while awaiting resumption of flare illumination. After another unsuccessful, illuminated rescue attempt, and with his fuel dangerously low and his aircraft significantly damaged, he launched again and commenced another approach in the face of the continuing enemy opposition. When flare illumination was again lost, Lt. Lassen, fully aware of the dangers in clearly revealing his position to the enemy, turned on his landing lights and completed the landing. On this attempt, the survivors were able to make their way to the helicopter. En route to the coast he encountered and successfully evaded additional hostile antiaircraft fire and, with fuel for only 5 minutes of flight remaining, landed safely aboard U.S.S. Jouett (DLG-29).


If you saw Sonny’s post this past Friday, you saw him take an unprovoked, unnecessary cheap shot at me. Friends, I don’t know what brought on this rather unbecoming hostility from my upstate brother but I am sure when he has a second to settle down he will see that his low reading skills have simply caused him to mistake my words as an insult to him when really they were just meant to cause laughter at his expense. His rash actions this past Friday are very similar to those of that young fella in charge of North Korea. Have you seen that he’s cancelled the 1953 armistice that stopped the fighting in the Korean War (the Korean guy, not Sonny)? I’m interested to see how the US responds. I don’t know how the previous administration would have responded, but I like to think President Bush would have gone on TV and said something like, “Now you listen here you little Asian midget… You keep up that talk about shootin’ a nuke at ‘merica, I’m gonna bitch-slap you all the way back to the stone ages. I’ve had just about enough of your mouth. Even the Chinese aren’t backing you on this one, so why don’t you just be a good boy and go sit in the corner while the grown-ups have a beer and talk about this Mt. Rushmore stuff going on over at I’m just sayin… and Sonny’Side. I tell ya, that Greg fella just cracks me up. I pretty much start all of our meetings asking Condi and Donny and Dickie if they’ve seen the latest posts…”

Anyway, that’s how I like to imagine his response would be.

Speaking of North Korea… have you seen this picture (I’d usually save it for my other blog, but it’s too good not to share here).

I don't care who you are, that's funny right there...



Thanks to Wikipedia for the info…

The Mount Rushmore of the Baltimore Orioles

Cal Ripken, Jr. – While little brother typically out shines big brother in my family, things are a little different in the Ripken family. Cal Ripken, Jr. played for the Orioles from 1981 – 2001. During this time, he played a team record 3,001 games (which included a MLB record 2,632 consecutive games). He was a 19 time All-Star (1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001), 8 time Silver Slugger Award winner (1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1989, 1991, 1993, 1994), two time Gold Glove Award winner (1991, 1992) and two time AL MVP (1983, 1991). Ripken was named the American League Rookie of the Year in 1982. He owns 14 Oriole records and a number of MLB records. He is given credit for helping save baseball after the owners and players tried to kill the sport in 1994. His #8 was retired by the Orioles in 2001. He was inducted into the Orioles Hall of Fame in 2003 and was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2007. He received the highest percentage of votes ever for a position player with 98.53%. This leads me to ask the question every baseball fan should ask… Have voting privileges been taken away from the 1.47% who it seems were too stupid to vote for an obvious hall of famer? I sure hope so.

Brooks Robinson – Brooks Robinson played for the Orioles from 1955 – 1977. He was an 18 time All-Star (1960 (x2), 1961(x2), 1962(x2), 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974), a 16 time Gold Glove Award winner (1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975) and two time World Series champion (1966, 1970). Brooks was the AL MVP in 1964 and the World Series MVP in 1970. His #5 was retired by the Orioles in 1977 and he was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1983. He is considered by many to be the greatest player in franchise history (with Cal being the other player usually in the conversation). He is a charter member of the Orioles Hall of Fame with Frank Robinson.

Frank Robinson – While also a star for the Cincinnati Reds, I’ve got Frank on this list because of the great job he did while playing for the Orioles from 1966 – 1971. While with the Orioles, Frank was a 5 time All-Star (1966, 1967, 1969, 1970, 1971) and a two time World Series champion (1966, 1970). He was the AL MVP and World Series MVP in 1966… the same year he won the Triple Crown. His #20 has been retired by the Orioles and, as I mentioned above, he is a charter member of the Orioles Hall of Fame with Brooks Robinson. Frank was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1982. I know this is a “players only” list, but I have to mention that Frank Robinson was the first black manager in MLB (and was AL Manager of the Year in 1989).

Jim Palmer – Palmer played for the Orioles from 1965 – 1984 (making him the only player on this list to play with all the other players on this list). He was a six time All-Star (1970, 1971, 1972, 1975, 1977, 1978), three time AL Cy Young Award winner (1973, 1975, 1976) and four time Gold Glove Award winner (1976, 1977, 1978, 1979). In a 19-year career, Palmer compiled a 268–152 record with 2,212 strikeouts, a 2.86 ERA, 521 games started, 211 complete games, and 53 shutouts in 3,948 innings. He never allowed a grand slam in his major-league career nor did he ever allow back-to-back homers. In six ALCS and six World Series, he posted an 8–3 record with 90 strikeouts, and an ERA of 2.61 and two shutouts in 17 games. Jim Palmer is the only Oriole to have played in every single World Series six total in the team's history (66,69,70,71,79,83). His #22 was retired by the Orioles in 1985. He was inducted into the Orioles Hall of Fame in 1986 and the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1990.


The Mount Rushmore of the Washington Nationals

Before they were the Washington Nationals, they were the Montreal Expos… so most of my list is made up of former Expos.

Andre Dawson – “The Hawk” played for the Expos from 1976 – 1986. While with the team he was a three time All-Star selection (1981, 1982, 1983), five time Gold Glove Award winner (1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985) and three time Silver Slugger Award winner (1980, 1981, 1983). He was also the 1977 NL Rookie of the Year. While with the team, he set many single season records. His #10 was retired by the Montreal Expos. Andre was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2010. One measure of a player is how his teammates feel about him. After he played with the Expos, Hawk went to play for my Cubs. His former Cubs teammate Ryne Sandberg campaigned for Dawson's induction during his speech at his own Hall of Fame induction ceremony in 2005: "No player in baseball history worked harder, suffered more or did it better than Andre Dawson. He's the best I've ever seen. I watched him win an MVP for a last-place team in 1987 [with the Cubs], and it was the most unbelievable thing I've ever seen in baseball. He did it the right way, the natural way, and he did it in the field and on the bases and in every way, and I hope he will stand up here someday." I don’t know if anyone could say it better than that right there.

Gary Carter – Carter played for the Expos from 1974 – 1984 and 1992. He was a seven time All-Star (1975, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984), three time Gold Glove Award winner (1980, 1981, 1982) and three time Silver Slugger Award winner (1981, 1982, 1984) while with the Expos. He was a great catcher whose youthful love of the game earned him the nickname “Kid”. His #8 was retired by the Montreal Expos. Gary was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2003.

Tim Raines – Tim played for the Expos from 1979 – 1990. During that time he was a seven time All-Star selection (1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987) and a Silver Slugger Award winner (1986). At one point he owned about 10 different Expos records (he may still own them, my research budget didn’t allow me to check). The Expos retired his #30.

Ryan Zimmerman - So the Expos and Nationals only really have three great players in their history… which means I’m going to have to dip into the pool of current players. For this, I’m going with Ryan Zimmerman. Zimmerman is a current member of the Washington Nationals (joining the club in 2005) and is a leader on the team. In his short career, he already has 1,110 hits (including 153 home runs) and 593 RBIs. He is an All-Star (2009), Gold Glove Award winner (2009) and two time Silver Slugger Award winner (2009, 2010).


Don’t forget to check out Sonny’Side to see if he picked the same guys as me or if he just picked the wrong guys…

Friday we’ll take a look at the A’s and the Diamondbacks.


Picture Tuesday

Mary Ruth having a little snack (and some cake) at Wyatt's birthday party over at The House of Kevin

Daniel and Mary Ruth swinging at the party

Daniel having a little fun in the train that they had there

Daniel on a big boy swing

Susie and Daniel having some fun at the party... no, they are not twins

Susie LOVED the swing

This is the splinter that I pulled out of The Wife's finger the day after the party... You would have thought her finger was about to fall off

We went out to lunch with some friends from our Sunday School class... I was sitting talking to Danny (yes, that Danny) when it was brought to my attention that something was going on on the other side of me... Susie was feeding Daniel her applesauce and, like a good boy, he was eating it

One last pic from the party... This one of Susie, Daniel and Mary Ruth playing together